Az a nar varft arein a shtein in vasser, kennen im tzen klugge nisht aroisnemmen. When a fool throws a stone into the water, ten wise men can’t get it out again.

Az a nar varft arein a shtein in vasser, kennen im tzen klugge nisht aroisnemmen. When a fool throws a stone into the water, ten wise men can’t get it out again.

2017-01-13T15:17:46+00:00Yiddish Wisdom|

 

fool

“Ten wise men were needed to save Sodom from being destroyed”, said the Kotzker Rebbe, “but it takes only one fool to destroy the world.” Or in the words of the Beastie Boys, it takes time to build, it takes a second to wreck it. With Drumpf’s inauguration on the horizon, coming relentlessly like the heat burst from the death star in Rogue One, the above statement seems all too true. How much work will it take to undo what one fool has done? An impossible equation to figure.

“This world is the world of work”, wrote the famous French born Jewish Torah commentator Rashi in the 11th century, “And here there is no rest.” Jewish tradition conveys a timeless urgency about moral action and the search for truth, and a relentless focus on details. Though in the peak days of the comfort bubble of mid-20th century capitalism it may have seemed to us like such stringent effort was misplaced and we should all learn to relax, accept a multiplicity of views, chill out and follow our bliss, the dark ride of the 21st century now underway suggests that such luxury is a perilous illusion.

How does this relate to our proverb? It takes a strong community to withstand the mischief of fools. The American lesson is that a community riven with weakness, self-interest, and moral compromise will collapse when one strong man with a sling-shot, swaggering in like a bizarro version of King David, animated not by faith but by lack of self-doubt, let’s his projectile fly. All of us have woken up to see that we are not able to sit back and enjoy the deteriorating pleasures of late modernity as it yeilds to something new and only partially imaginable, but must sober ourselves and put our hands to the plough. “You are not obligated to finish the work, but nor are you free to desist.” (Pirke Avot).