Anger, Part 2

לאז נישט דעם רוגז אבערנאכטיקן ביי דיר
Loz nisht dem rogez ibernechtiken bei dir
Don’t let your anger stay overnight with you.

As I wrote a few weeks ago, this saying reflects an old teaching in Judaism. In Tehillim/Psalms and Mishle/Proverbs there are many sayings warning against the dangers of anger. Rabbinic teachings follow suit: One must not persist in a quarrel (Sanhedrin 110a). The traditional Siddur (prayerbook) lists “making peace between one person and another” as a mitzvah (good deed) whose fruit one enjoys both in this world and the next (Hasidic prayerbooks add, “and between a man and his wife!”).

All of this teachings concern what you could call personal anger. This is anger that arises from an affronted ego, or from frustrated desire. There is no question, in my opinion, that the vast majority of our anger is of this type. What, however, should we say about impersonal anger? Moral outrage? Just indignation?

The Jewish tradition seems to make more room for this. The prophets certainly seem very angry at times, and not because someone made them a crappy espresso.

So says the LORD, roars Amos, I will bring a fire on Judah and devour the palaces of Jerusalem…I will not reverse it, for they sell the righteous for silver and the needy for a pair of shoes!

Stephen Lewis, the npoliticaltical activist, recently told CBC that all of his work fighting poverty, AIDS, and injustice was fueled by “pure rage”.

On the other hand, we live in what many have called “days of rage”. We suffer from a plague of anger, frustration, irritability, cruelty, bullying, and judgementalism on all sides. This cannot be healthy- it blinds our understanding, details our communities and our communication, and increases our stress, all the while decreasing our joy and power.

If there is a difference between personal anger and impersonal anger, there is surely a difference between impersonal anger that motivates action and the kind that sinners and rages without being productive. The latter kind just weakens us.